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Volunteering on Your College Applications

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❶Below are three real community service essay prompts.

How Volunteering Abroad Can Help Your College Application

Leveraging Volunteer Abroad Programs to Enhance Your Overall Community Service Experience
Sample Excellent College Application Essay #6
Sample Excellent College Application Essay #7

In 11th grade, it is time to focus and get good at something. Usually by this time, students also have a better sense of the overlap between what they are good at and what they like. We help students stand out in this overlap for the last 2 years of high school and in 12th grade tell admissions committees what they stand for and who they are. Volunteer work is seen as one of the classic indicators of college admissions - something to tick off to gain admission to show you are a good samaritan.

This is the opposite of the truth. Find that overlap I was mentioning earlier and volunteer work will fall naturally into that overlap. For example, if you are passionate about medicine and hope to be a doctor someday, find a way to help younger students get excited about science. Earlier, I said the answer was that it depends on the college. It does, but first you have to find your area of interest.

Doing general volunteer work is almost never helpful for admission to the Top colleges. How do you determine how much time to invest into volunteer work for that overlap of interests that you have? At Synocate, we have developed a series of analysis here - www. For example, you can click on a school and see in section 3. This tells you on a scale of , 4 being the most important, how important volunteer work is for that college in the admissions process. At Princeton, in this report in Section 3.

All extracurricular activities are also ranked at 2, so that means Princeton focuses more on your essay and GPA rated 4 out of 4. This is a great liberal arts college that loves to see students who find a specific area of interest and can give back to the community.

These types of insights can help students, counselors, and parents navigate the college admissions process and choose the colleges that match their strengths.

How far that boy has grown; now, I am a man who loves greeting others: Passengers dozed peacefully in the cramped, cold, and dark cabin, eye masks on. A sudden jolt, riveting the plane, spurred only a few grumbling snorts from the unconscious travelers. The engines droned while chatty flight attendants gossiped behind a curtain. Everyone seemed at ease, if not bored. Passengers stared blankly at the monitors in front of them and stewardesses sighed when summoned by blinking lights bearing their caricatured silhouettes.

I imagined pilots, surrounded by panels of crude switches, nodding off in the wake of the vast and empty frontier ahead of them. I, however, found the flight neither boring nor exciting; as a twelve-year-old, everything about air travel terrified me.

My white-knuckled fists, glistening with cold perspiration, clamped onto the nearest armrest at the mere hint of turbulence. I bawled during takeoff, clenched my eyes shut while landing, and remained fidgety and sour in the intervening hours. This phobia began affecting me long before my actual departure, days or sometimes even weeks in advance.

At first I would lie awake into the wee hours of the night, actively calling forth violent fantasies of what could very well happen during the coming flight.

My first vision would be of a quick death: I considered this possibility most preferable, as I would not have to endure the torturous moments of panicky contemplation that would accompany falling to my death. What if the plane did not simply explode, though? What if a wing dropped off at 30, feet? My fantasies would delve into every conceivable disaster, each less plausible yet more terrifying than the previous. Just how carefully did they inspect the engines? In fact, my mind would be so consumed by thoughts of my impending demise on the flight that the prospect of survival would was begin to seem improbable, despite my continued existence flight after flight.

On this particular trip, though, my fears were nearly realized. After settling into my seat as much as I was capable after takeoff, my gaze flickered out the window, coming to rest on the billowy plains below. My father joined me and began naming the illuminated grid patterns and landmasses gliding by beneath us when he noticed something I had not: I tried not to look or listen as the pilot arrived at my seat to observe the phenomenon.

He craned his neck in what seemed a scrupulous observation and, after a few moments of squinting, delivered his analysis. My father and I leaned forward, expecting more explanation or at least some tangible emotion. The pilot, however, returned to the cockpit without answer, apparently realizing that we would not be able to comprehend, much less do anything about the information he had just gathered.

No doubt this would delay our arrival. At this announcement, two passengers had seizures and a jittery man seated behind me had to be handcuffed. Most, however, remained quietly anxious in their seats and either resumed napping or continued to stare cross-eyed into the tiny monitors ensconced in the headrests of the persons in front of them.

Remarkably in this tense situation, I suddenly stopped obsessing about crashing. Now that I was actually facing real aviation danger, I refused to let fear overwhelm me during what could have been the last moments of my life. Though the chances of our plane being struck by lightning still hovered at roughly half of one percent, those tiny odds were still far greater than the chance of encountering an accident on any other normal flight, which had previously been enough to scare me into near total incapacitation.

The increased threat of death did not send me into panic, instead focusing my thoughts on my goals and future. In that situation, I clung tightly to the two very important people sitting next me as I reminisced about those I would leave at home and imagined the new friends and acquaintances I might never meet.

I realized then that fear was really just noise, a mere distraction drawing me away from the issues of real importance in my life.

It was tunnel vision, corrupting my mentality, consuming me totally in its overwhelmingly irrational, one-dimensional state. It was an addiction and a vice, and I had lived with it for far too long.

Because of it, I had grown used to enduring flights like I did the nightmares I contrived; they seemed to never end. Thanks to my newfound clarity, the remaining hours of that tense flight slipped away without dread, and I never again obsessed over our odds even as we touched down.

Instead, more important things replaced those figures and fantasies, such as the duties and goals I aspired to accomplish during my life. Rather than focusing on fear, I resolved to direct my energies and thoughts at all that I have left to accomplish. While I have no control over possibly perishing in a freak airplane accident, I do have the ability to improve my chance of attaining my dreams; thus, I intend to spend my life constantly looking forward, rather than worrying about how high I rise or how far I may fall.

Whenever you have a match, just put this little red chip on top of it. As I was teaching that eighty-year-old woman how to play bingo, she, along with many other seniors, was teaching me how to live a fulfilling life. As a dedicated volunteer at Deaconess Hospital, I work closely with elderly patients, both organizing and participating in activities. Since the summer of my junior year, I have played a vital role in assisting with bingo games for patients, helping to set up and run those games almost every Saturday.

Then, prior to the start of each game, I go around the room with a colorful bowl collecting twenty-five cents from each of the players. Despite the measly sum of the fee, however, I often struggle to gather the funds; very few people willingly give up their money.

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Dec 05,  · College Admissions: Volunteer Service That Gets You Into College "Taking the lead to bring about change in a community will help set a student apart from his or her peers, but communicating.

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Essays Interviews Volunteering can help you learn more about yourself and even put you on a path to your future career. When you list your volunteer work on your college applications, you show admission officers the value you’ll bring to their campus community.

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Does Volunteer Work Matter For College Admissions? These types of insights can help students, counselors, and parents navigate the college admissions . It appears that you are viewing this site with an outdated browser. Ever dreamed of flying? It appears that you are viewing this site with an outdated browser. admission college essay help volunteering.

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Volunteering on Your College Applications. by Jessica Rinker Student, Fairhaven High School How do I talk about volunteering on my college apps? all of these questions, but they can help you get started. Always be aware of your audience, and be sure you answer the application or essay . Here are four ways volunteering can help you on your journey to college: Experience. outside the classroom while also appealing to college admissions officers—especially if they read about your volunteer work in your application essay. Apart from test scores, grades, and GPA on your transcript, admissions officers also want to see who you.